Schimel asks Supreme Court to block Evers' request

Law & Politics

Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel is asking the state Supreme Court to block state Superintendent Tony Evers from getting his own attorney in a lawsuit challenging his office's powers.

Schimel late Monday asked the court to reject Evers' request to disqualify Schimel from representing him.

Evers doesn't want Schimel representing him because the Republican attorney general agrees with the position taken by a conservative law firm in a lawsuit against Evers. The lawsuit alleges that Evers is in violation of a recently passed state law giving the governor oversight powers in the agency rule-making process.

Schimel says in his court filing that he has a duty to represent Evers and the Department of Public Instruction in the case, but Evers could hire his own personal attorney if he wishes.

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Grounds for Divorce in Ohio - Sylkatis Law, LLC

A divorce in Ohio is filed when there is typically “fault” by one of the parties and party not at “fault” seeks to end the marriage. A court in Ohio may grant a divorce for the following reasons:
• Willful absence of the adverse party for one year
• Adultery
• Extreme cruelty
• Fraudulent contract
• Any gross neglect of duty
• Habitual drunkenness
• Imprisonment in a correctional institution at the time of filing the complaint
• Procurement of a divorce outside this state by the other party

Additionally, there are two “no-fault” basis for which a court may grant a divorce:
• When the parties have, without interruption for one year, lived separate and apart without cohabitation
• Incompatibility, unless denied by either party

However, whether or not the the court grants the divorce for “fault” or not, in Ohio the party not at “fault” will not get a bigger slice of the marital property.